Categories
Blog Posts

Society is Dependent on…

Sir Ken Robinson died on 21st of August 2020 and he was one of my first ever heroes… I wanted to share this quote with you in the hopes that you will redefine your definitions of ability and intelligence.

Human communities depend upon a diversity of talent, not a singular conception of ability. And at the heart of the challenge is to reconstitute our sense of ability and intelligence.

Sir Ken Robinson

I want to address something I hear & read about a lot: that disabled people are disposable. Worth less. To say that disabled people are a ‘drain on society’ or resources or taxpayers or whatever else is to say that the success of society is measured by money. In actual fact, the word ‘society’ comes from the Latin socius (companion) and was first found in English in the mid-16th century meaning ‘companionship, friendly association with others.’ Society is thus defined by relationships. Just as everything in life is, really. A plant’s relationship with the sun is essential for its survival. Our relationships with each other is vital for our own wellbeing, as lockdown has taught us all too well.

Therefore, not only is this idea that disabled people are less productive, less capable or less worthy fundamentally untrue, it would also mean that every single one of us is a drain on society. Is a pregnant woman on maternity leave a drain on society because she has stopped working? Absolutely not. What about those who are battling cancer or depression? Both disabling illnesses but not the people you would immediately consider when you hear the term ‘disabled people’. Our capability to love makes us all inherently valuable. Worth is not something you earn or something that can be taken away. We, as disabled people, are no more a drain than anybody else. Given the right access and accommodation, given a society that did not disable us- the empathy, work ethic and fire we possess from being oppressed is one of the most valuable resources on earth!

We are society, so whatever we don’t like about it, we have the power to change. Diversity. Society depends upon us.

This blog post originated from a newsletter I sent out to the Communi-tea a few weeks ago, if you’d like to be the first to hear updates, or want some book, song, & film recommendations gracing your inbox each week, you can sign up here!

Categories
Blog Posts

The Gap Between Two Healthcare Worlds

Dominique Viel, founder of InvisiYouth, shares her story with us today!

‘When people find out I launched InvisiYouth Charity five years ago when I was 22, the follow-up questions tend to all fall into the categories of “How did you come up with a nonprofit supporting young adult chronic illness lifestyle?” or “You’re so young to run a nonprofit, how do you manage it?” or even “What makes young adult healthcare so different from pediatrics and adults?” If you look at it, the main theme stemming through all the questions around my philanthropy is a lack of understanding the young adult experience and what makes it one of the most vital times for an individual to be supported. 

I was a teenage competitive tennis player with a laser focus on the life I wanted to live, but one injury resulted into years without proper diagnosis and complicated treatments as my chronic illnesses began to take center stage. I’m lucky I have a supportive family that stood by my side through all the horribly challenging times, like my mom being at every doctor’s appointment. “This is your health and your body, Dominique,” my mom would say. “No matter how old you are, you have to remember you are the patient and deserve to be as active of a participant in your healthcare as you can.” 

It was her encouragement to always ask those “why” questions to our doctors when I didn’t understand or didn’t agree with a treatment plan that mattered the most as I began transitioning from pediatric to adult healthcare. When you’re in that 13-35 age demographic dealing with health struggles, you fall into the gap between these two healthcare worlds. You’re not dependent on others to make choices for yourself, but you shouldn’t be thrown into the deep-end of your treatment programs. You’re in the most critical time of your life, cultivating what matters to you, establishing your voice, and building your future life…but there’s no healthcare to specifically support you.  

That fear of being invisible in my own healthcare journey fueled my passion to build InvisiYouth Charity, a global nonprofit helping teens and young adults with chronic illness or disability (physical AND mental) to have the right lifestyle tools, virtual resources, leadership programs and empowerment to thrive with any health struggles. You’re never ‘invisible’ with InvisiYouth, but rather ‘invincible’ because this population has the best skills to adapt, conquer, and excel. It is my goal that every young adult has tools to know they are represented, validated and supported on their unique health journey.

My chronic illnesses have become my life’s teammates and no longer the enemy taking value away. I will always crave gaining knowledge and sparks of joy from my life and work. I wake up and go to sleep as a person with a purpose that happens to also have chronic illnesses. Each day I work to pursue my goals, make InvisiYouth better, and always give back so others can feel just as knowledgeable to thrive in their daily lives like I do.’

You can find more about this charity on their website or @InvisiYouth on Instagram.